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Regulated Professions

If you work in a regulated profession, you will need a license, certificate or registration to practice in your field. The Pathway to Licensure for your profession will show you how to get your qualifications assessed and recognized.

The professions listed on this page will provide you with information about:

  • Pathway to licensure
  • Profession-specific programs
  • Alternative careers
  • Resources and links

For more help, or if your occupation isn’t listed, please contact your Employment Specialist.

Multi-stakeholder Work Groups

To build a fair system for assessing and recognizing international qualifications, ISANS leads Multi-stakeholder Work Groups. Each work group focuses on a specific profession. Their purpose is to make sure pathways are fair, unnecessary requirements are removed and programs are developed to help skilled immigrants get licensed and working in their fields.

Each work group includes representatives from the regulatory body, government, educational institutions, professional associations, employers, unions and ISANS. The groups also include representatives of internationally educated immigrants. In this way, your voice is heard, your concerns are expressed and your ideas brought to the table.

Get more information about multi-stakeholder work groups.

Architects

Architecture is a regulated profession in Canada. To practice independently, you must have your qualifications recognized and be licensed. The Nova Scotia Association of Architects is responsible for regulating the practice of architecture in Nova Scotia but to begin, apply to the Canadian Architectural Certification Board (CACB). There are two pathways to licensure. You will need to find a Canadian licensed architect as a mentor or employer because experience in Canada is necessary for both pathways. Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help with contacting local firms as well as assistance with your resume & portfolio, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the costs of accreditation. Get started today!

Pathway to Licensure

Useful Links & Resources

Dental Professionals

Internationally Educated Dental Professionals (IEDPs) regardless of their education, licensure or experience, must obtain a license to practice their profession in Canada. Each province or territory has its own licensing organization that sets the requirements and regulates the practice of the dental profession and specialties within the jurisdiction.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation. Get started today!

Internationally Educated Dental Professionals (IEDPs) Bridging Program

As an Internationally Educated Dentist (IED), you will have an opportunity to participate in formal study groups with fellow immigrant dentists and the Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia-IEDP Bridging Program Coordinator. Attending the study groups will allow you to share knowledge, experience, resources and will encourage learning while utilizing expertise from colleagues in the group. On-site books, materials and electronic resources are used to facilitate these sessions.

Resources

Engineers

Internationally Educated Engineers come to Canada with various levels of valuable experience and education. In Canada, all engineering graduates must complete four years of supervised work under a Professional Engineer (P. Eng.) and write an exam in Law and Ethics before they can become a P. Eng. Each province has its own professional organization that sets the requirements but the designation is accepted across Canada. Engineers Nova Scotia is the professional organization for engineers in Nova Scotia.

Pathway to Licensure

Internationally Educated Engineers (IEE) Bridging Program

The Internationally Educated Engineers (IEE) Bridging Program at ISANS assists IEEs with understanding the Canadian work environment, providing competency assessment program, understanding the pathway to licensure in Nova Scotia and supporting the IEE’s individual path with courses and support groups through the following programs.

Learn more about the IEE Bridging Program...

Resources

Engineers Nova Scotia
Engineers Nova Scotia is the licensing and regulatory body for Professional Engineers and Engineers-in-Training in Nova Scotia.
1355 Barrington Street, Halifax, NS B3J 1Y9
Phone: (902) 429-2250
Toll Free: 1-888-802-7367
E-mail: info@engineersnovascotia.ca
Website: www.engineersnovascotia.ca

Lawyers

As a Lawyer, you already know that every country has its own laws and judicial system. The challenges you will face in qualifying to practice in Canada will depend on whether the legal system of your first country is Common Law, Civil Law, religious law or a combination. Except for the province of Quebec, Canada’s legal system is based in Common Law.

In the province of Nova Scotia, the best place to start the process is at the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society. The Pathway to Licensure diagram will help point out your options. An Employment Specialist at ISANS can help you figure out the pathway(s) that can work for you.

Observership Program for Internationally Trained Lawyers

If you are interested check out the brochure and also talk to your Employment Specialist.

Other Useful Websites for Internationally Trained Lawyers

Online NCA Exam Prep Program – Osgoode Hall Law School – York University

This program is specifically designed for internationally qualified lawyers and law graduates planning to write the National Committee on Accreditation’s 5 mandatory examinations. The Online NCA Exam Prep Program offers instruction in the following subjects:

  • Foundations of Canadian Law
  • Canadian Constitutional Law
  • Canadian Administrative Law
  • Canadian Criminal Law
  • Professional Responsibility

Helpful Resources & Articles

Internationally Trained Lawyers Multi-stakeholder Work Group

For several years now, the Nova Scotia Barristers’ Society and ISANS have been leading an effort to make changes and improve licensure processes. ISANS and other key stakeholders participate actively on this Work Group to identify barriers and develop solutions.  Read more...

Medical Laboratory Technologists

Internationally Educated Medical Laboratory Technologists (IEMLTs) regardless of their education, licensure or experience, must obtain a license to practice their profession in Canada. Each province or territory has its own licensing organization that sets the requirements and regulates the practice of medical laboratory technology profession. This means that you must hold a license to be able to practice medical laboratory technology in Nova Scotia.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation.

Pathway to Licensure

Resources and Important Links

Capital Health – Health Sciences Library – Resources

IEMLT Bridging Program

Other Helpful Links for MLTs

Company resource material

Venipunture:  watch the video

Hematology: use the online Atlas of Hematology to supplement your study from a reference textbook

Transfusion Science Canadian Blood Services

Microbiology:  UOIT Microbiology Virtual Lab

Special Stains: Anatomy-Histology Tutorials (for special stains)

General Histology

Microanatomy

Histology:  Image Bank

Internationally Educated Medical Laboratory Technologists Multi-stakeholder Work Group

To work in a regulated occupation requires a particular certification or licensure. Skilled immigrants understand the importance of high standards of practice, but they need fair and realistic opportunities to have their qualifications assessed and recognized so they can work in their fields.  Read more…

Nurses

There are two types of nurses in Nova Scotia: Registered Nurses and Licensed Practical Nurses. A Registered Nurse (RN) has a 4 year Bachelor of Nursing degree from a university. A Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) has a 2 year diploma from a Community College.          

To find out how to get your nursing qualifications assessed as a Registered Nurses contact the College of Registered Nurses of Nova Scotia. For Licensed Practical Nurses contact the College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Nova Scotia. If you’re not sure which kind of nurse you are, either College will give you advice.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation.

Registered Nurses

Licensed Practical Nurses

For information about how both types of nurses work together in the healthcare system check out the following resources:

Nova Scotia needs nurses – particularly in long term care facilities and rural communities – so get started today!

Helpful Links

Registered Nurses Professional Development Centre

  • Orientation to the Canadian Healthcare System for Internationally Educated Healthcare Professionals
  • Exam Preparation Support
  • Bridging Program

Toll Free: 1-800-461-8766
Fax: (902) 473-7590
rnpdc@nshealth.ca
www.rnpdc.nshealth.ca

Self-Assessment
This self-assessment tool is designed to help you understand the Canadian licensed practical nursing profession. The tool will outline the competencies, skills, and abilities that licensed practical nurses must have to apply for licensure or registration in a Canadian province or territory

Pathway to Success for Internationally Educated Nurses (for LPNs)

For information about how both types of nurses work together in the healthcare system check out the following resources:

Other Resources

Internationally Educated Nurses Multi-stakeholder Work Group

To work in a regulated occupation requires a particular certification or licensure. Skilled immigrants understand the importance of high standards of practice, but they need fair and realistic opportunities to have their qualifications assessed and recognized so they can work in their fields.  Read more…

Other Healthcare Professionals

There are many different healthcare professions in Canada.  You need a license to practice in most of them.  Here are some useful links to information about some of these professions.  The best place to start is to contact an Employment Specialist at Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia who can help you understand the pathway to licensure, and find programs to help you work in your field.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation. Get started today!

Self Assessment Tools

Resources

Capital Health Online Resources

Occupational Therapists

Dietitian

Physiotherapists

Pharmacists

International Pharmacy Graduates (IPGs) regardless of education, licensure or experience must obtain a license to practice their profession in Canada. Each province or territory has its own licensing organization that sets the requirements and regulates the practice of the pharmacy profession within the jurisdiction. Nova Scotia College of Pharmacists is the regulatory body for pharmacy practice in Nova Scotia.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation. Get started today!

Pathway to Licensure

Pharmacists’ Gateway Canada provides licensing information, self-assessment tools and a centralized document repository for International Pharmacy Graduates:

International Pharmacy Graduate (IPG) Bridging Program

The International Pharmacy Graduates (IPGs) Bridging Program at ISANS assists IPG’s with understanding and meeting standards of practice in Canada and achieving professional goals such as licensure and employment.

For more information and program details please visit the IPG Bridging Program page.

 Onsite and Online Resources

ISANS has a library of textbooks and reference books that IPG’s can borrow. There is also a reference lists of PowerPoint presentations and websites that can be accessed through ISANS online learning community.

To be referred to the IPG Bridging Program, please contact your employment specialist.

Resources

Capital Health – Health Sciences Library - Resources

Pharmacy Education at Dalhousie University

Related Articles

International Pharmacy Graduates Multi-stakeholder Work Group

To work in a regulated occupation requires a particular certification or licensure. Skilled immigrants understand the importance of high standards of practice, but they need fair and realistic opportunities to have their qualifications assessed and recognized so they can work in their fields.  Read more…

Physicians

International Medical Graduates (IMGs) regardless of education, licensure or experience, must obtain a license to practice their profession in Canada. Each province or territory has its own licensing organization that sets the requirements and regulates the practice of the medical profession and specialties within the jurisdiction. The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia (CPSNS) is the regulatory body for medical doctors and surgeons in Nova Scotia.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation.

Pathway to Licensure

International Medical Graduates (IMG) Bridging Program

The IMG Bridging Program offers a number of programs, services, and resources to support IMGs entry into the Canadian healthcare system. Learn more about the IMG Bridging Program.

To register for the IMG Bridging Program please talk to your Employment Specialist.

Resources

International Medical Graduates Multi-stakeholder Working Group

To work in a regulated occupation requires a particular certification or licensure. Skilled immigrants understand the importance of high standards of practice, but they need fair and realistic opportunities to have their qualifications assessed and recognized so they can work in their fields. Read more…

Skilled Trades

Nova Scotia needs skilled tradespersons and there are many designated trades in Nova Scotia. Some are “compulsory certified trades” under the Apprenticeship and Trades Qualification Act. This means that you must have a Certificate of Qualification or be an apprentice (learning on-the-job) to work legally in that trade. Most trades are not compulsory. Click here for a list of the compulsory and non-compulsory trades in Nova Scotia.

Contact an Employment Specialist at ISANS for help in understanding the pathway to licensure, getting assistance in developing your resume, learning interview skills, understanding Canadian workplace culture and accessing financial assistance for the cost of accreditation. Get started today!

Pathway to Certification

General Information for Immigrant Tradespersons

Other Helpful Links: Construction Trades

Teachers

There is good news and bad news for you as an internationally educated teacher settling in Nova Scotia. The good news is that, as a teacher, you have many skills and competencies, which you can use to find satisfying work here! The bad news is that because of a declining birth rate in Canada, there are very few openings in the public school system at this time. As older teachers start to retire, it’s very possible that this situation will change but for now, you’ll need to explore other teaching-related careers. These challenges face all new teachers whether educated in Canada or internationally.

As an internationally educated teacher, it may still be useful to apply for a Nova Scotia teacher’s certificate. It can be a useful credential for other jobs. The Pathway to Licensure shows you the steps to take. Contact your Employment Specialist for help with navigating the pathway, setting career goals and exploring alternative careers.

Other Helpful Resources

Technicians & Technologists

Resources

Self Assessment Tool for Technicians and Technologists

Internationally educated engineering technicians and technologists can sign up on this website and complete the self-assessment tool. This tool will help you in identifying your skills according to the Canadian engineering technology system.

Veterinarian

A veterinarian in Canada is a doctor of veterinary medicine (DVM), a professional in animal health care who has completed a university degree at a veterinary college.  Almost 75% of Canada’s veterinarians work in private practice.  Close to 40% work exclusively with small animals, while approximately 35% work in large and mixed animal practice.  Veterinarians are also involved in many other activities that protect both animal and human health. (Source)

Pathway to Licensure

Resources