The Challenges of English in the Workplace

Nova Scotians are outgoing and friendly and love to make small talk at work, but what if you come from a country where this isn’t the norm? What about technical jargon and expressions that you don’t understand? You feel like a fish out of water!

Choosing to move and then adapting to life in a new country is challenging. Finding employment, housing, and establishing yourself in a community are just a few of the first big considerations you face upon arrival. When you find work, there are more challenges still – you need to adapt to a new business culture, learn the workplace etiquette, and adjust to the job specific language.

Language issues and misunderstanding social cues can affect your self confidence – even if you have years of experience in your field. Support is essential to all immigrants, regardless of their language abilities. In fact, most of the time language is not the major stumbling block…

Notice! English as an Additional Language

Please note: We have decided to make the move from using the term ESL (English as a Second Language) to EAL (English as an Additional Language). We are doing this for the following reasons:

  1. To recognize and respect the fact that newcomers who are learning English may already speak two or more languages. English is not always the second language.
  2. To keep current with the trend across the country of organizations who are recognizing and respecting this fact.

Language Learning and Healthcare

Dr. Massoud Shahin is enthusiastic about and grateful for the programs he has accessed through Immigrant Services Association of Nova Scotia. Dr. Shahin says English for Internationally Educated Healthcare Professionals opened up a new world for him in terms of improving his language, especially in communicating with patients, making professional … Read more