40th Anniversary of 60,000 Vietnamese ‘Boat People’ Arriving in Canada

A group refugees (162 persons) arrived on a small boat which sank a few meters from the shore in Malaysia. The flight of Vietnamese refugees began after the fall of Saigon in 1975. In spite of the dangers of unfriendly waters and piracy, tens of thousands took the South China Sea,. ( K. GAUGLER/AFP/Getty Images)
A group refugees (162 persons) arrived on a small boat which sank a few meters from the shore in Malaysia. The flight of Vietnamese refugees began after the fall of Saigon in 1975. In spite of the dangers of unfriendly waters and piracy, tens of thousands took the South China Sea,. ( K. GAUGLER/AFP/Getty Images)

From The Current, April 29, 2015. 

It was April 30th, 1975, forty years ago, that the last U.S. helicopter slipped over the horizon on the outskirts of Saigon, and unceremoniously signaled the end of the Vietnam War. Within 24 hours, on May Day, as they’d planned it, the North Vietnamese flag went up over the Presidential Palace, and Saigon officially became Ho Chi Minh City.

But it took much longer for hundreds of thousands of Vietnamese to start new lives… Over the next four years, they clamoured onto boats headed for virtually anywhere.

Tuan Tran was part of the first wave, fleeing in November, 1975. Tuan Tran got into the boat with his two children and they became one of the many Vietnamese ‘Boat People’, part of wave, after wave of refugees… fleeing Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. At least half-a-million died. But Tuan Tran was one of the lucky ones.

Tuan Tran’s boat landed on the shores of Malaysia and he found his way to a United Nations refugee camp. But for many so called ‘Boat People’, there was no such warm reception. Boats were often, simply pushed back out to sea. And many of those people who did make it to dry land, were destined to scratch out a meagre existence, with little or no support.

After four months inside that refugee camp, Tuan Tran emigrated to Canada. So did another 5,000 or so other members of that first wave, between 1975 and 1976. And another 50,000 would join them in a second wave, mostly between 1979 and 1980…

Read the entire article and listen to the stories on CBC’s The Current website.